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A 2010 study in the journal Scientometrics, looking at data between 1907 and 2007, concurred: The “overall growth rate for science still has been at least 4.7 percent per year.”

Since knowledge is still growing at an impressively rapid pace, it should not be surprising that many facts people learned in school have been overturned and are now out of date. But at what rate do former facts disappear? […]
Applying the concept of half-life to facts, Arbesman cites research that looked into the decay in the truth of clinical knowledge about cirrhosis and hepatitis. “The half-life of truth was 45 years,” he found.

In other words, half of what physicians thought they knew about liver diseases was wrong or obsolete 45 years later. Similarly, ordinary people’s brains are cluttered with outdated lists of things, such as the 10 biggest cities in the United States.

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matpringle:

‘Kurt Vonnegut’ by Mat Pringle. Click to read! 
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John Hockenberry about design

An object imbued with intent — it has power, it’s treasure, we’re drawn to it. An object devoid of intent — it’s random, it’s imitative, it repels us. It’s like a piece of junk mail to be thrown away.

Design [is] the emerging ethos formulating and then answering a very new question: What shall we do now, in the face of the chaos that we have created?

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A study now suggests that simply taking a break does not bring on inspiration — rather, creativity is fostered by tasks that allow the mind to wander.

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Atul Gawande on How do we heal medicine?

In every field, knowledge has exploded. But it has brought complexity, it has brought specialization. And we’ve come to a place where we have no choice but to recognize, as individualistic as we want to be, complexity requires group success. We all need to be pit crews now.

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We’re conditioned to think that our lives revolve around great moments. But great moments often catch us unaware – beautifully wrapped in what others may consider a small one.

(Source: twitter.com)

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Christian Heilmann on how twitter is not an adequate place to have an argument.

References a great TEDx presentation by Jay Smooth: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Discussing Race. I like the part where Jay explains that being a good person is a constant exercise, like maintaining good hygiene is, and not a single step to perfection.

(Source: twitter.com)

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37signals Signal vs. Noise weblog ; Jason Fried on reacting to other’s ideas.

There’s also a difference between asking questions and pushing back. Pushing back means you already think you know. Asking questions means you want to know. Ask more questions.

There are two things in this world that take no skill: 1. Spending other people’s money and 2. Dismissing an idea.

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Ken Fisher on Paul Gilding's TED presentation “The Earth is Full

We cannot have infinite growth on a finite planet.
The most important issue we face is how we respond. The crisis is now inevitable. The issue is how we react.

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To-do list

(Source: nowinpocketsize)

Tags: human video life